On this day in history in 1863, President Abraham Lincoln delivered what became known as the Gettysburg Address. He spoke that familiar phrase recounting how “Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.” 

Note: If you do the math, he is referencing the year 1776. Not 1619.

He continued, “Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure.”

It feels as if we are, yet again, testing whether this great nation can long endure.

If nothing else, this year has caused the deep division within our nation to take center stage. We are divided in our policy stances, our politician preferences, and even our understanding of right and wrong.

Our freedoms have been challenged by authoritative politicians, both elected and unelected alike, who wish to curtail our rights under the banner of public health and safety.

Allegations of fraud have raised doubts as to the accuracy and legality of our electoral process.

These problems we face have underscored the vital role we play here at American Majority in fostering a coalition of bright and patriotic leaders to lead our country towards a better future.

May we never forget what 2020 has shown us – the consequences of underestimating the impact your local leaders have on your daily life and your ability to live as you wish.

Like Lincoln, I pray that “…government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate — we can not consecrate — we can not hallow — this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us — that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion — that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain — that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom — and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

Abraham Lincoln

November 19, 1863